Protected: How I became a Marxist

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7 comments
George Mackin
George Mackin

"just as well it wasn’t Fred West huh?" For sure, you would not be alive to tell the tale and tell it so well. And your family and friends would be tho' and they would would deeply damaged by that loss.

admin
admin

"his actions could be interpreted as “grooming”, taking a hostage(Stockholm syndrome), getting a minor drunk, paedophilia & brain washing…?" Had I been 19, his actions viewed from 2012 would be troubling, but in 1987, I suspect they were quite the norm - a maneuvering of women into bed, relying on a lack of objection as consent. The lie was mine and he can't be held responsible for it. I dont know how he would have reacted if I had told him I was actually 14 - kicked me out with no money and nowhere to go? - phoned the police/authorities/my mother? I don't think it was so much adolescent hormones as an unorthodox attitude to risk (I remember contemplating on the trip down that he might turn out to be a serial killer), just as well it wasn't Fred West huh?

Vicky Hyde
Vicky Hyde

I'll bet many women on the left know what an explosive mix adolescent hormones and an enquiring mind can be.Your own adventure into adulthood doesn't need to be tainted by attitude (&legal!)changes over the last 35 years. What a shame you couldn't keep the rest of the literature! What troubles you George? The possibility that an experienced, educated man of the left could be so poor at personal communication that his actions could be interpreted as "grooming", taking a hostage(Stockholm syndrome), getting a minor drunk, paedophilia & brain washing...? No rose tinted spectacles to view comrades through, please!

admin
admin

No, I never told Margaret where I had been: she never asked, I never volunteered. I did tell my best friend of the time, Vicky who thought it was a very daring adventure, but that he was a creepy old man. 25 years later, I would love to meet him again (not least to find out what the bloody hell that letter was, its bugged me for years), but he's preserved in my memory at the age I am now, and I still feel a bit guilty of the lies I told him. I don't feel resentful towards him or feel like he exploited me, if that's what you're asking. There was an obvious power imbalance, even taking away the fact that I was quite a bit younger than I told him I was, he was still far older, far more worldly and far more powerful than me, but worse things happen at sea and I bear him no ill whatsoever.

George Mackin
George Mackin

I had to have a second read at your article. It gave me the feeling of having a stone in my shoe and I had to take the shoe off to see what was making me feel uncomfortable. Yet uncomfortable I am, with aspects of this tale. The head and the heart, eh, and the different lessons they tell us. Did you speak to Margaret or any your pals after this experience and what did they make of it and what do you feel about that man after all this years?

George Mackin
George Mackin

Hopefully, more to follow. What about your family what influence did they have on your politics ?

Vicky Hyde
Vicky Hyde

Truly, the routes to Marxism are many and varied! I hope it's not too much of a generalisation to say that in my experience, women comrades have much more interesting narratives than the men. Thank you for sharing, Mhairi.

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